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Why should I store artifacts? I'm doing it but i don't know if it still make sense.

  • My builds are fairly quick
  • I do git tag versioning
  • None of my builds depends on another. (all independent micro-services)

Any compelling reason to keep this "Artifactory code" in my pipelines?

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One argument in support of storing artifacts is that it promotes consistency when deploying across different environments.

From Continuous Delivery by Humble and Farley:

Every time you compile the code, you run the risk of introducing some difference. The version of the compiler installed in the later stages may be different from the version that you used for your commit tests. You may pick up a different version of some third-party library that you didn’t intend. Even the configuration of the compiler may change the behavior of the application.

By only building artifacts once, we make sure that the production code is exactly the same as that which has gone through testing. In very small codebases with simple pipelines, it might not make too much of an impact, but it's still best practice to only build once.

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    Those are compelling reasons.| As a devops engineer i can't ensure that all builds will use the same dependencies every time. Also, despite the fact that my builds run in a docker container, it gives me the freedom to update containers at any time without risk of inconsistency. Thanks. – gabrielpe Aug 1 at 23:09

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