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Are all virtualization (OS/above-OS) utilities commonly considered DevOps utilities?

These could be OS virtalization utilities like VirtualBox and Vagrant and maybe also WSL is considered as such and also, above OS virtualization tools like docker (AFAIK CMs like Ansible, Chef, Puppet and so forth aren't meant for "virtuallizing" anythin).

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I'd say you have touched another, far more fundamental question - what makes a utility a "DevOps" one? That is, how do you measure the "DevOpsness" of a tool and formalize facts in this context?

Possibly, my wish list for DevOpsness of a tool, virtualization tools or other, if they fulfill further criteria down on this list:

  • Open and interoperable API, both for operational and intelligence needs
  • Optimized workflows, see "developer experience"
  • Machine readable configuration as code
  • User community
  • Short release cycles
  • Certificate of software quality which is nowadays yet very ambigous
  • I guess we can sum it up and say that a sysadmin (most likely for Linux), with an expertise in virtualization tools === DevOp. – JohnDoea Dec 9 '18 at 15:34

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