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Artifactory is a product by JFrog that serves as a binary repository manager. That said very often one will use a 'artifactory' as a synonym of the more general binary repository, much like many people use Frigidaire or fridge to denote the refrigerator regardless if it is a Frigidaire brand or not. The binary repository is a natural extension to the ...


21

The way it helped me understand initially, the difference between source code repository and binary repository was to think of it like: * Github or Bitbucket is useful to maintain all 'code' * Jfrog Artifactory is useful to maintain the built 'binary' At least till I was comfortable with these terms! Also, the importance of Artifactory can be understood in ...


12

Artifactory is a Binary Repository Manager product from Jfrog. You're right - being a binary repository manager it is typically used to manage storage of artifacts generated and used in the software development process. From Artifactory's main webpage: As the first, and only, universal Artifact Repository Manager on the market, JFrog Artifactory ...


10

I think complicating things is what everybody is getting appreciated for nowadays. I will try to answer this question in short . Source Repository is used for storing code and its versions, while artifactory is used for storing the executable programs that are outputs of those code [ binaries - dll, jar, war, ear,msi,exe files etc] Now the reason why you ...


8

Am using both right now. Nexus will support more repo types with the free version than Artifactory but Artifactory will have more repos support in the paid tier Nexus now support Conda natively (since a few weeks ago if memory serves) Artifactory will be quite pricey, especially if you plan on having tests and staging instances to test out your config ...


8

JFrog Artifactory and JFrog Bintray both manage binaries (and any other file type you can think of). I'd like to see them as two different parts of your CI/CD pipeline. Artifactory is mostly meant to be used inside the organization. For managing all binaries coming in as dependencies (like maven central jars) and being produced by your build process (like ...


6

This can be done through the Jrog CLI. The CLI has a recursive option that looks like it will do what you hope. jfrog rt upload --recursive artifactory-mirror/* artifact-repo/dir-struct/ The CLI also has some performance improvements for uploads that doing it through curl or a browser don't seem to get. Also, scriptable! To include full directory structure ...


6

I have used both in enterprise settings a fair bit, but I had never really thought this through until reading the question. Artifactory seems much more complete/impressive to me, but I have used it more recently than Neuxs, so I was worried that I might be biased. I just spent ~30 minutes reading online. Virtually every comparison or article is either ...


6

JFrog Artifactory pros Artifactory supports 25+ package types, while Azure supports only Maven, npm, NuGet and Python. You can get Docker and Helm with Azure Container Registry but it’s a separate tool. Artifactory is fully hybrid - available both for on-premise installations and as SaaS - with full parity between the versions. With Artifactory you can ...


4

Microsoft Artifact makes a lot of sense if you are using other Microsoft Azure products such as their DevOps solutions. If you are using Azure, Microsoft Artifact will integrate well with the rest of the platform, have better support (only 1 vendor to deal with), and should have better performance since the data will all be in their network. Additionally, ...


4

Saved bandwith and faster downloads: Artifactory stores the artifacts that are downloaded from maven central. So if another developer needs the same dependencies they don't need to be downloaded again from maven central but instead they can be delivered from the local artifactory instance. This makes downloading faster because company networks are usualy ...


3

If the artifacts in question are docker images then the recommended artifact management solution is the Container Registry, well integrated with other GCP products producing and/or using such images. AFAIK they don't have a real artifact manager for other kinds of artifacts, they suggest the rather general purpose Cloud Storage for that. You can find an ...


3

Local repositories serve artifacts from your local storage. These are found in paths like this one: http://<host>:<port>/artifactory/<local-repository-name>/<artifact-path> Remote repositories act as proxies to remote locations which may e.g. be other Artifactory servers. They also provide caching. These are found in paths like this ...


3

A virtual repository is a collection of local, remote and other virtual repositories accessed through a single logical URL. A virtual repository hides the access details of the underlying repositories letting users work with a single, well-known URL. The underlying participating repositories and their access rules may be changed without requiring any client-...


3

An artifact Is something that is produced/generated/crafted out of a specific process Jar out of a Java project build. Question out of your mind Car out of a factory New song A repository Is a receptacle where things are persisted Github for a Java project. StackExchange for your daunting questions IN THEORY, an Artifact-ory would be a repository of ...


3

There are a few main reasons why you would use Artifactory (or any other binary repository manager) over a traditional file storage (in your case NFS). The ability to manage your artifact versions A central location to access artifacts across infrastructure (which you have accomplished with NFS) The ability to download/recreate previous versions of the ...


2

In many cases compilers are used as-is, already packaged by 3rd parties. When changing the structure of the build systems changing compilers usually translates into switching to a different version, but which is also pre-packaged. If this is your use case the artifact repository offers a single advantage: availability. Even if the provider decides (for ...


2

Artifactory allows you to define a virtual repository which is a collection of local, remote and other virtual repositories accessed through a single logical URL. A virtual repository hides the access details of the underlying repositories letting users work with a single, well-known URL. The underlying participating repositories and their access rules may ...


2

As @XiongChiamiov mentioned, it's a very hard question to answer, but here's a clue: Artifactory is a network-bond server. It means given enough storage, CPU and memory, it will max out your network interface first. Network interface is considered maxed out at half its rated bandwidth limitation. That can help you do the math.


2

It is. You can install the ZIP installation and unzip it in the EFS. Alternatively, install using Debian/RPM and mount the EFS to /var/opt/jfrog/artifactory in advance. Alternative approach can be to only configure the Filestore to use the EFS.


2

If you're using Java/Maven/Gradle, Azure Artifacts only supports ONE external repository: Maven Central. If your package is not in that repository, you are pretty much bound to use Artifactory or Nexus, or some similar alternative.


2

In order Artifactory to cache your dependencies, you need to retrieve them from Artifactory. Once you use your virtual repository, which contains the Maven Central remote, Artifactory will download the dependencies from Maven Central and will cache them for the future use. So, here's what you need to do in order to populate Artifactory with your ...


2

Welcome, Vivek 👋🏻 This is not how it works 😀 Your local cache (~/.m2) is not transferred to Artifactory if anything the direction is the other way around (in some point of time you'll see files from Artifactory appear in your local cache). When you run a Maven build, the configuration you provided in Maven (check the Set Me Up button in Artifactory UI) ...


2

Yes, you can set up push event-driven replication. Please note that while pull replication prepopulates remote repository in server A from a local repository in server B, push replication replicates between two local repositories. Once you set up a virtual repository it doesn't really matter because you'll have a single point of access anyway, but just ...


2

Since the timeout is a Helm option and not a Kubernetes object attribute, it can't be embedded in the chart itself. The --timeout option is the amount of time the Helm utility will wait for Kubernetes commands to complete before marking the release as FAILED. More Info on Helm CLI options


2

Ask your Artifactory admin to increase the upload size in General Configuration->File Upload Max Size (MB)


1

A new service have been released this year called Artifact Registry


1

My problem was that the docker-machine didn't have enough memory to run both services at the same time. Using those commands fixed it: docker-machine stop "C:\Program Files\Oracle\VirtualBox\VBoxManage.exe" modifyvm default --cpus 2 "C:\Program Files\Oracle\VirtualBox\VBoxManage.exe" modifyvm default --memory 4096 docker-machine start (The path to the ...


1

You should use of the Retrieve Latest Artifact endpoint. It uses the repository layouts to know what is the version in your artifact path, so you want to make sure those are set right for you. In this case, it's a standard Maven layout, which is the default for Maven repo, so you're all good.


1

I'd go with (2). Since Bob has a more rigid setup (requires Maven metadata), and Alice can provide that (using more flexible Ant), that sounds like the easiest way to go.


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