10

Try this solution: Pull Request Merge Conflict Extension. It helps to resolve conflicts inside the pull request page.


6

Simply keep pushing stuff between the repositories. Git pushes are designed for exactly that. So, if origin is the old repository, and newis the new one, and you want to move new stuff in the master branch from origin to new, then, locally: git checkout master && git reset --hard # to clean up any local changes, optional git pull origin git ...


6

Here is my YAML for multiple artifacts from a single build. pool: name: Hosted Windows 2019 with VS2019 demands: - msbuild - visualstudio - vstest - npm steps: - task: NuGetToolInstaller@0 displayName: 'Use NuGet 4.4.1' inputs: versionSpec: 4.4.1 - task: NuGetCommand@2 displayName: 'NuGet restore' inputs: restoreSolution: '$(...


6

Monorepos have been getting a lot of attention in recent years since google popularized them. If you aren't on a similar scale as google it might not work out as well for you. I've been in a startup that moved to monorepos and we quickly found that: most tools are built with one repo leading to one artifact that gets deployed. You will have to rework all ...


6

As suggested by @030, I have prepared two screenshots that show how to connect the .yml files with the build pipeline. Rename the .yml file in the repository Open the pipeline editor Select the file from the dropdown Select the in step 1 renamed *.yml file and click on save. After the existing .yml is assigned, the pipeline works as before the renaming.


6

Very few people were viewing this thread, so afterwards I posted a duplicate question on Stack Overflow, and now contains the answer. Below is a copy of it ... Finally, I found the problem. I wonder if this is a bug, or just poorly documented....(or maybe I just didn't interpret it correctly). As per Leo Lui-MSFT's suggestion above (documented by ...


5

According to this Azure Q&A it should be possible to change the name of the yaml file by clicking on "Edit in the visual designer".


5

This question runs two risks: of being marked as "primarily opinion-based", and its answers might age poorly. However, I think it's useful to express an opinion, if only for posterity; if and when things change, there may be better answers -- but there will always be blank slates. I would split the problem up into four sections: Infrastructure ...


4

Azure DevOps supports artifact filters for each environment. Below is screenshot of how to enable the feature.


4

Infrastructure as code means that the infrastructure configuration is stored in a version control system (VCS). If changes will be applied, it is traceable who changed the code and when. Although it is unclear to me what the aim is of your question, it is possible to use a continuous integration (CI) tool like, Jenkins, gitlab, circleci that pulls the code ...


4

This has been fixed in recent version of Azure DevOps. Currently you can easily rename or move the pipeline in the list of pipelines while clicking on 3 dots and select Rename/move and change your location or move the pipeline


4

I am not sure this tab appears 100% of the time, you still have to merge some cases locally, but you can merge some PRs without any extensions in latest UI update.


4

I will try to elaborate a lite about those topics. When secret expires and you got error, you have to refresh connection. Go to Edit dialog for connection and save without any changes. Described here: Azure devops service connection expired and cannot edit/renew But I have already tested scenario when I delete all secrets assigned to service principal used ...


3

If you use python and GitLab like I do, you can include a test coverage report in your CI/CD pipeline. You pip install coverage and then just run coverage in your pipeline. The following is an excerpt from an AWS lambda pipeline, but you should be able to find something similar for your environment: script: - pip install -r ./awslambda/requirements.txt ...


3

I noticed that the description for the filepath properties of the pack command is different than the descriptions in the test and publish commands: Pattern to search for csproj or nuspec files to pack. You can separate multiple patterns with a semicolon, and you can make a pattern negative by prefixing it with '-:'. Example: **/*.csproj;-:**/*.Tests.csproj ...


3

I also use the classic editor, and I have implemented this for our builds. My use case was that I have a set of common set of build/release scripts stored in their own repository, and I want the ability to bring them into the application builds that I am executing. I created a custom Task Group with an Inline PowerShell script to do this: # Reference: ...


3

Apologies for not directly answering your question, but by the sounds of your question, you are trying to build an update management system to mitigate the threats of vulnerable operating system components and tools having unpatched vulnerabilities which expose you to risk. This functionality is actually already available for both Windows and Linux via ...


3

I'm looking this fact: I have an ASP.NET Core 3.0 application for which I have a full CI/CD setup in Azure DevOps. The Application is hosted on a Ubuntu 18.04 server machine. Therefore I can safely assume that you are developing ASP.NET Core 3.0 app to be hosted in Ubuntu. Any .NET Core 3.0 (or later) application means that you should rely on the dotnet ...


3

There are different strategies and, depending on your specific problem domain, you need to decide what makes sense for you. For server side applications, especially micro services, you typically don't need release branches. You can work with pull requests, but once they hit master, it is common to deploy (from master) and never look back. Managing release ...


3

The best way to have AWS CLI tooling installed to your custom agent is by installing from Visual Studio Marketplace. AWS CLI is part of AWS Tools for Azure DevOps Service and Azure DevOps Server (the on-premise Azure DevOps) under the name of "AWS Tools for Microsoft Visual Studio Team Services". Installing this AWS Tools will enable AWS tooling on CI (...


3

I had this problem too, coming from github where you can usually resolve text file changes in browser. On your local repo, you want to get the latest then reverse-merge, so in your case // Precursor to ensure your local is the same as origin git pull master git checkout feature/ENGA-2514 git pull feature/ENGA-2514 // include all of the other branches ...


3

After resolving some syntax issues, I found the true cause of failing to throw the error. In my prior usage I was doing this through Inspec provisioner, which handled the exit codes. If you are using Pester and having to do the workaround I described above, then to ensure error's in a step are thrown you need to throw an exit code other than 0. The two ...


3

Most answers to these questions are going be subjective and influenced by your particular organization's workflows and culture. Little of this response if more than just my own opinion and experience and much is not really specific to Azure DevOps but can be applied to any build and release orchestration tooling. Azure DevOps itself has very little to do ...


3

You can do: variables: templates.ref: $[ resources.repositories['templates'].ref ] See Repository Details docs.


2

I'm using https://docs.gitlab.com/ee/workflow/repository_mirroring.html#pushing-to-a-remote-repository to push everything into a repository in VSTS, easily done via access token with the right permissions.


2

Only put a library in a separate repo when it is used in two different repos. If that is not the case then put the code in the same repo. Otherwise one could run into the anti-pattern nanoservices.


2

I use separate pipeline for each app you could use powershell task to restart IIS, but I dont think there is a way to do this without shutting down the website. You can also reconfigure website, so copy new code to location X, repoint website to location X, restart website. Then you can easily point it back if something fails and switch is almost ...


2

@Shayki's answer was a large portion of what I was looking for (thanks!), but I was eventually able to figure out a solution that met all of my requirements. It involves a less than ideal use of the Release Description to propagate state between jobs. The updated flow diagram looks like this: I was originally thinking of the conditional flow as an if else ...


2

So you want to deploy a desktop application to a Windows machine? Looking through the rest of the documentation, the following links may be helpful: Windows Machine File Copy task Build, test, and deploy .NET Core Apps I can't tell for sure, but you might just be looking for a way for users to download the build artifacts. If that's the case, this link on ...


2

You have multiple storage solutions in Azure (i.e. blob, file system). All of these integrate with Pipelines and are good target locations for your build artifacts. Now that you have the build you just need to figure out how people are going to use/install what was built. There are several possible answers depending on what you are trying to accomplish: ...


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