5

Simply keep pushing stuff between the repositories. Git pushes are designed for exactly that. So, if origin is the old repository, and newis the new one, and you want to move new stuff in the master branch from origin to new, then, locally: git checkout master && git reset --hard # to clean up any local changes, optional git pull origin git ...


4

Infrastructure as code means that the infrastructure configuration is stored in a version control system (VCS). If changes will be applied, it is traceable who changed the code and when. Although it is unclear to me what the aim is of your question, it is possible to use a continuous integration (CI) tool like, Jenkins, gitlab, circleci that pulls the code ...


4

This question runs two risks: of being marked as "primarily opinion-based", and its answers might age poorly. However, I think it's useful to express an opinion, if only for posterity; if and when things change, there may be better answers -- but there will always be blank slates. I would split the problem up into four sections: Infrastructure ...


3

If you use python and GitLab like I do, you can include a test coverage report in your CI/CD pipeline. You pip install coverage and then just run coverage in your pipeline. The following is an excerpt from an AWS lambda pipeline, but you should be able to find something similar for your environment: script: - pip install -r ./awslambda/requirements.txt ...


3

Azure DevOps supports artifact filters for each environment. Below is screenshot of how to enable the feature.


3

Here is my YAML for multiple artifacts from a single build. pool: name: Hosted Windows 2019 with VS2019 demands: - msbuild - visualstudio - vstest - npm steps: - task: NuGetToolInstaller@0 displayName: 'Use NuGet 4.4.1' inputs: versionSpec: 4.4.1 - task: NuGetCommand@2 displayName: 'NuGet restore' inputs: restoreSolution: '$(...


3

Monorepos have been getting a lot of attention in recent years since google popularized them. If you aren't on a similar scale as google it might not work out as well for you. I've been in a startup that moved to monorepos and we quickly found that: most tools are built with one repo leading to one artifact that gets deployed. You will have to rework all ...


3

Apologies for not directly answering your question, but by the sounds of your question, you are trying to build an update management system to mitigate the threats of vulnerable operating system components and tools having unpatched vulnerabilities which expose you to risk. This functionality is actually already available for both Windows and Linux via ...


3

I'm looking this fact: I have an ASP.NET Core 3.0 application for which I have a full CI/CD setup in Azure DevOps. The Application is hosted on a Ubuntu 18.04 server machine. Therefore I can safely assume that you are developing ASP.NET Core 3.0 app to be hosted in Ubuntu. Any .NET Core 3.0 (or later) application means that you should rely on the dotnet ...


3

There are different strategies and, depending on your specific problem domain, you need to decide what makes sense for you. For server side applications, especially micro services, you typically don't need release branches. You can work with pull requests, but once they hit master, it is common to deploy (from master) and never look back. Managing release ...


2

I'm using https://docs.gitlab.com/ee/workflow/repository_mirroring.html#pushing-to-a-remote-repository to push everything into a repository in VSTS, easily done via access token with the right permissions.


2

Only put a library in a separate repo when it is used in two different repos. If that is not the case then put the code in the same repo. Otherwise one could run into the anti-pattern nanoservices.


2

I use separate pipeline for each app you could use powershell task to restart IIS, but I dont think there is a way to do this without shutting down the website. You can also reconfigure website, so copy new code to location X, repoint website to location X, restart website. Then you can easily point it back if something fails and switch is almost ...


2

I noticed that the description for the filepath properties of the pack command is different than the descriptions in the test and publish commands: Pattern to search for csproj or nuspec files to pack. You can separate multiple patterns with a semicolon, and you can make a pattern negative by prefixing it with '-:'. Example: **/*.csproj;-:**/*.Tests.csproj ...


2

You have multiple storage solutions in Azure (i.e. blob, file system). All of these integrate with Pipelines and are good target locations for your build artifacts. Now that you have the build you just need to figure out how people are going to use/install what was built. There are several possible answers depending on what you are trying to accomplish: ...


2

From what I can see you have done everything correctly, you have stored both the certificate material (i.e. the PFX) and the password for the PFX in a secure location that presumably no one else can access. Assuming you don't give anyone else permissions on your Azure tenant and you don't blindly accept pull requests that change azure-pipelines.yml then you ...


2

The error message you have provided indicates that this is a problem with the configuration that could be permission related. Here are some steps to help resolve this issue: You can follow guides where other people have configured the two. Pay special attention to the permission settings that are selected. Double check your permissions on the servers. ...


2

As suggested by @030, I have prepared two screenshots that show how to connect the .yml files with the build pipeline. Rename the .yml file in the repository Open the pipeline editor Select the file from the dropdown Select the in step 1 renamed *.yml file and click on save. After the existing .yml is assigned, the pipeline works as before the renaming.


2

You can create a Release Pipeline with a stage for every environment. On each stage you can copy files, etc. and run tests against the environment. If the test/stage succeeds, the pipeline goes ahead to the next stage. Between the stages, you can configure that an authorized person has to approve the next step. The screenshot below is a release pipeline of ...


2

The best way to have AWS CLI tooling installed to your custom agent is by installing from Visual Studio Marketplace. AWS CLI is part of AWS Tools for Azure DevOps Service and Azure DevOps Server (the on-premise Azure DevOps) under the name of "AWS Tools for Microsoft Visual Studio Team Services". Installing this AWS Tools will enable AWS tooling on CI (...


2

You can create build pipeline triggers to trigger your builds based on branch along with path triggers. In your release pipeline, you can set triggers and filters to decide which artifacts to be deployed.


2

The stock Azure Pipelines app for Slack does not support that workflow of uploading artifacts to Slack. You could use this marketplace task and upload your release notes artifact with it. Bonus points suggestion, if you are going down the release notes path I would take a look at using Richard Fennell's Generate Release Notes task in combination with the ...


2

Using a remote state file and referencing the state from a different state template would be the way I would go. Would need to add an output to resource that needs to be shared as well as configuring remote state storage, access controls, and security. This URL has example of setting up the remote backend in azureRM. https://www.terraform.io/docs/backends/...


2

Yes you can do this under branch policies. From the GUI navigate to Repos-> then in the hamburger menu branches-> then select your master branch and then ... on choose Branch Policies. Like so Then from the branch policies page scroll down and find the Add Automatic Reviewer button and set a path filter based on the folder.


1

This is an indication that someone removed a field from work item configuration that was represented by 25. It's more of an issue of clean-up not being done when fields are removed. See more about this error on Microsoft's Developer Community. This other item in the community suggests a different problem when using a particular extension and a fix has ...


1

You can separate the steps, especially as it would let you do divide the work among different agents. You can also leave them in a single agent if you wish. The primary advantage I see is leveraging different pools for different sets of work. With releases last I checked variable scope was limited (as of 2018) to the "phase". I wouldn't necessarily ...


1

Do not trigger Build 2 automatically from Build 1. Instead add a last step to Release 1 to queue Build 2. There are a few ways to do it, e.g. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/52821204/how-to-queue-build-pipeline-as-task-from-release-pipeline


1

EDIT Microsoft added a new hosted agent: Hosted Windows 2019 with VS 2019. So you should use this image to build for windows-1809 or windows-2019 Source : https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/devops/pipelines/agents/hosted?view=azure-devops&tabs=yaml#use-a-microsoft-hosted-agent Old answer: FWIW, I ended up creating a windows server 2019 vm on ...


1

You may try TFS Aggregator (Web Service). If you or your team have experience with C#, you may try the console project that I`ve developed: Automation of state changing.


1

Activity Logs can only able to show the resource level logs like creating a resources,deleting a resources modify the SKU of the resources etc, Assuming from your question you are saying web app deployment from azure devops,which is more like a deployment of code to an existing webapp which will not be covered by activity logs. You need to go to that azure ...


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