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A good approach for distributing .Net Core console applications is to make them a dotnet tool and publish them to a Nuget feed. It should be as simple as adding some config to the csproj and run dotnet pack This assumes you have a private Nuget feed for your company which Azure DevOps can provide if you don't.


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From what you've described, it seems the "one commit" is a merge commit. This is due to how git works: depending on the steps you performed to get your code merged, it will or will not create a merge commit in the target branch. Check your git history to confirm it. If that is the case, you can safely ignore it. In a typical git workflow, your &...


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First, from your description, it is clear that you are using a graphical engine for git. That can sometimes present issues. Second, this message means that you have not pushed your commit and someone has made an additional commit in your current branch (and pushed their changes) after you last pulled and comitted. To resolve the issue: Push your commit. How ...


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Docker allows you to pull a cache from anywhere with a --cache-from command. See dockumentation here: https://docs.docker.com/engine/reference/commandline/build/#specifying-external-cache-sources The easiest approach is to build your images with the --build-arg BUILDKIT_INLINE_CACHE=1 flag which stores the metadata needed to build from cache. You can store ...


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Ideally yes, you'd want your developers to be able to run the code locally for the sake of unit tests (as one example) and then - when ready - commit to a remote repository on Azure DevOps. You could then issue a PR, merge into (for example) the 'develop' branch, and have this branch kick off your CICD pipeline in Azure DevOps to deploy to your development ...


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