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6

I will make my answer, based on the knowledge for security testing, but IMHO this can be generalized. Black box testing - when the tester know nothing about the system, components, liaisons, connections, etc. This can be helpful more like UI/UX testing, functional testing. Example: you do not work for Microsoft and also you do not have the source code and ...


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The "how" of extremely high-frequency deployment is all about very mature engineering practices and tooling. The "unicorns" (Gene Kim's term for the type of company you list) have some of the best talent in the industry, and invest in the best technology. One of several key practical differences between these unicorns and most other orgs is the level of ...


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Kubernetes supports namespaces. multiple virtual clusters backed by the same physical cluster These namespaces can allow you to use one cluster for all your environments. You can also do fancy things in your CI/CD pipeline so that each branch or each commit gets its own namespace. Those pods in prod namespace can still speak to pods in dev namespace ...


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As answered by Romeo Ninov in Black Box testing, tester is unaware about the application internal structure. This method is named so because the software program, in the eyes of the tester, is like a black box; inside which one cannot see. This method attempts to find errors in the following categories: Incorrect or missing functions ...


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These big companies are using unconventional solutions, such as the BitTorrent deployment system and geographically distributed content delivery networks (CDNs). When Facebook updates its code or generates a new build, the binary files needs be pushed to all of the company's servers (~1.5GB), so they created its own custom BitTorrent tracker designed to ...


2

You could use the same tools used in Trunk Based Development (TBD) to carry work-in-progress in the trunk (the only non-release TBD branch with a longer lifespan): feature-toggles/feature-flags branch by abstraction: "Branch by Abstraction" is a technique [1] for making a large-scale change to a software system in gradual way that allows you to ...


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Some thoughts: You do not have to clone the entire project. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/2466735/how-to-checkout-only-one-file-from-git-repository-sparse-checkout?utm_medium=organic&utm_source=google_rich_qa&utm_campaign=google_rich_qa discusses how to checkout a single file. I have also had good results using curl to get single files off ...


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I can confirm that running Docker on Mac works just fine, but according to this ServerFault question, it's not possible to just run MacOS in Docker. (You might be able to run MacOS in a VM in a Docker container, but that's probably not what you want.) You could purchase a MacMini, use it as a Jenkins slave and run automated tests on it as part of your ...


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Supplementary to @Levi's answer I would also advise you to consider where you plan to test changes to your Kubernetes cluster (any change that can impact how your cluster operates e.g: lifecycle). To satisfy this and provide another alternative to the mix, you could operates 2 clusters. One for your non-prod environment (dev, test and acc) and one for the ...


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Not exactly a full answer, but you need mostly three things: Automation of the delivery pipeline (Continuous Delivery) A very, very strong test system (including canary release) Good coding practices to ensure versions can run concurrently on the same environment. This usually include tooling for code review, code linting, unit testing, orchestration, ...


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