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6

While Romeo has laid out the basic facts I'd like to add a bit of experience to the answer: Basics Cacti is focused on graphs. It doesn't do any of the up/down monitoring that is provided by something like Nagios. Classically Nagios does not provide any useful graphs, but more on that later. Config Scaling Cacti tends to be configured through the GUI ...


5

Nagios is generic monitoring solution which can be extended by using snmp agents, custom plugins and so on. Cacti is a complete frontend to RRDTool, it stores all of the necessary information to create graphs and populate them with data in a MySQL database (from here) Cacti can be used as graph solution in Nagios to represent in graphic manner ...


2

Personally I don't think using CasC itself will have any negative scalability impact. Fundamentally CasC means the actual config files are not hand-maintaned, instead they're auto-generated following version-controlled rules - which can be a lot more reliable. But once the config files are generated - the service using them functions just as it dit with ...


2

You have a few options for this: If you can pay for this, use commercial API monitoring solutions like Runscope or APImetrics. They're easy to setup, have no maintenance overheads, and show you detailed data and alerting etc. The problem with this approach is that they cost money, and if you have a miniscule ops budget or this is a hobby project, it can be ...


2

Varnish is monitored with what they call VSM. It's a file in your container. If you bind mount the folder where the files is, you can share the same folder / files in other containers that will be able to read it, and thus will be able to monitor your varnish instance. See the note about VSM and containers in varnish docs. I have been able to launch a ...


2

According to How to let dpkg -i install dependencies for me? it sounds like dpkg doesn't have support for automatically installing a package's dependencies. Personally I'd switch to a package manager which has such support, like apt-get. You'll like it ;) Alternatively you could: use a "helper" application around dpkg as suggested in the above-mentioned ...


1

Having a CasC setup means that you are in a better position to deal with any scalability issues that should arise later. It should take you a while to max out a nagios box. As long as you haven't starved it of memory or something you should be able to get thousands of nodes on a single nagios box. How many depends on how many checks you're doing and how ...


1

From my experience in managing a Nagios deployment with version controlled configuration files and CI/CD, it works really well. You can collaborate with other teams more easily since you can grant access to a git repository, and you gain all the benefits of CI/CD e.g. rollback and automatic testing. One thing that may be a bottleneck is how frequently you're ...


1

You can try built-in tools that provide by AWS. AWS calls them Management Tools. Amazon Inspector Automated security assessment service to help improve the security and compliance of applications deployed on AWS. Amazon Inspector is an automated security assessment service that helps improve the security and compliance of applications deployed on AWS. ...


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