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7

Sonatype's Nexus 3 Pro supports High Availability through a couple of mechanisms that are collectively known as Component Fabric: Peer-to-peer Repository Managers means there is no one master, also known as a single point of failure. Packages are replicated between the nodes to ensure they are eventually consistent. Storage Backends mean you can use high ...


4

This can be done through the Jrog CLI. The CLI has a recursive option that looks like it will do what you hope. jfrog rt upload --recursive artifactory-mirror/* artifact-repo/dir-struct/ The CLI also has some performance improvements for uploads that doing it through curl or a browser don't seem to get. Also, scriptable!


4

If you are building these artifacts for a release/deploy, you will want them to be in as ready to release of a package as possible. If that is as a .zip, then yes you should create the .zip on the Jenkins server, then upload to Nexus. Your deploy system will then download, decompress, and manipulate the artifact as seen fit. In general, I would only use the ...


3

Am using both right now. Nexus will support more repo types with the free version than Artifactory but Artifactory will have more repos support in the paid tier Nexus now support Conda natively (since a few weeks ago if memory serves) Artifactory will be quite pricey, especially if you plan on having tests and staging instances to test out your config ...


3

I have used both in enterprise settings a fair bit, but I had never really thought this through until reading the question. Artifactory seems much more complete/impressive to me, but I have used it more recently than Neuxs, so I was worried that I might be biased. I just spent ~30 minutes reading online. Virtually every comparison or article is either ...


3

If the artifacts in question are docker images then the recommended artifact management solution is the Container Registry, well integrated with other GCP products producing and/or using such images. AFAIK they don't have a real artifact manager for other kinds of artifacts, they suggest the rather general purpose Cloud Storage for that. You can find an ...


3

A virtual repository is a collection of local, remote and other virtual repositories accessed through a single logical URL. A virtual repository hides the access details of the underlying repositories letting users work with a single, well-known URL. The underlying participating repositories and their access rules may be changed without requiring any ...


2

Local repositories serve artifacts from your local storage. These are found in paths like this one: http://<host>:<port>/artifactory/<local-repository-name>/<artifact-path> Remote repositories act as proxies to remote locations which may e.g. be other Artifactory servers. They also provide caching. These are found in paths like this ...


2

Artifactory allows you to define a virtual repository which is a collection of local, remote and other virtual repositories accessed through a single logical URL. A virtual repository hides the access details of the underlying repositories letting users work with a single, well-known URL. The underlying participating repositories and their access rules may ...


2

No, you don't need maven. Maven is a build automation tool as ant and gradle are, generally, but not limited to, jvm based projects. Nexus is an artifact repository, but some others exists. Artifact repositories software have different set of features (license, different storage options, different repositories type support like gems or npm ..., search ...


2

(upon request from comments) BlackDuck has tools to monitor use of open source components, and "manage open source compliance & security"


1

There are a few ways to do this, but by far the easiest is to put your credentials (either username/password or ssh keypair) into the Jenkins built-in credentials store and then use the sshagent step in your Pipeline script: sshagent(credentials: ['my-credentials']) { sh('scp mynexus.com/my_artifact.zip ~/my_artifact.zip') } You may need to install the ...


1

Try this: # Get status curl http://localhost:8081/nexus/service/local/status # List of repositories curl http://localhost:8081/nexus/service/local/repositories For the json parameter: curl -i -H "Accept: application/json" <url> More information, see this link


1

Try to chain withRegistry like this: docker.withRegistry('https://registry:10500', 'credentials-id') { docker.withRegistry('https://registry:10501', 'credentials-id') { docker.build(imageToBuild.getName(), '-f ' + imageToBuild.tag + '.Dockerfile .').push(); } }


1

In Nexus, go to the Admin Backend. Create a blob store if you haven't already. Guidance can be found here: https://help.sonatype.com/repomanager3/configuration/repository-management#RepositoryManagement-BlobStores Once you have a blob store, continue like so: Choose "Repositories", hit "Create Repository". Choose "docker (proxy)" as the recipe. Give it ...


1

And looking into the logs above, is it safe to run this task? And will we need any downtime for this? I would suggest to backup all artifacts and upload them to a new Nexus (I created n3dr for this) as I have seen multiple errors in Nexus that did not give me enough confidence to just run some tasks. Once we deployed a new Nexus and included it in our ...


1

Nexus 2 was deployed instead of Nexus 3. The docker feature seems to be introduced since Nexus 3. This blog indicates how to configure a docker repository and how to push and pull docker images. The blog contains multiple pictures. The following picture indicates how to enable the docker registry:


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