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3

docker-compose is just a glorified wrapper around docker which gives you a nice textual representation of all the options you would regularly give to docker build or docker run. Plus, of course, it bundles several docker images/containers together. That said, it has no provisions to run anything else than you would get by calling docker. I don't see how you ...


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You will find people from both camps (terminating TLS as soon as possible vs terminating TLS in the application code) but it's not as serious as for example tabs vs spaces. The benefit of terminating TLS by reverse proxy is that application developer does not have to implement TLS in the application itself - possibly introducing bugs. Another benefit ...


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I have done this in the past using https://github.com/hashicorp/consul-template. What consul-template does it generate a configuration file (for nginx) based on a certain template you provide. And the values that it fills into this template are coming from the configuration stored in consul. Each time your micro-services register themselves in consul and ...


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I suggest you mount your conf file as a volume: docker run -v nginx.conf:/etc/nginx/nginx.conf .... This way you can easily change the file outside the container and then just restart the container. If you change your config file inside the container and then you should have to restart nginx to pick-up the changes. At that point your container will stop ...


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If the system recently rebooted and your proxy server is giving 502/503s, it's most likely that the backend service failed to start. Using whatever tools are most appropriate for your OS/distro (e.g. systemctl, service/chkconfig, stop/start/restart/etc.), do the following things: Verify that the backend (in this case Jenkins) is configured to start on boot....


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Thanks to this question and answer here, I was able realize that I had two issues going on: the containers have different default Docker networks because I am using two different docker-compose.yml files, I had envisioned my Ngnix proxy working independently from any of my API containers entirely, including the docker-compose, more on that issue below the ...


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Oops, turns out I just have to remove the line listen [::]:443 ssl ipv6only=on; and it works. it's leftover from running NGINX certbot, I thought that was important


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All my searches for a term brought me to conclude that the general term either for one Apache virtual host file or a constellation of Nginx block files (each containing at least one block) is just that --- a virtual host. Per project; either the virtual host (entity) is a single file or a combination of files, and that's true if the webserver software is ...


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Problem is in resources - I see that each app container has own nginx instance, and server (VPS) must have global nginx, working as reverse proxy for containers. Generally speaking yes, this is how this sort of thing goes. It's more of an issue for PHP than other languages because PHP doesn't really have a standalone application server, but instead is ...


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I found the problem it is unrelated. The index.html file itself was the 'directory access is forbidden


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As per this docker documentation the copy instruction may have multiple sources but only one destination. Your first copy is coping two file /etc/passwd and /etc/group to /etc.


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Changed the challenge from tls-sni to: --preferred-challenges http and the certificates are renewed.


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I was able to combine your two example files by first converting them to JSON. foo.json { "apiVersion": "extensions/v1beta1", "kind": "Ingress", "metadata": { "name": "nginx-ingress" }, "spec": { "tls": [ { "hosts": [ "foo.bar.com" ], "secretName": "tls-secret" } ], "rules": [ { ...


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Could I have these two different definitions which creates a single Ingress with two rules (based on having the same name)? Lets investigate whether that would be possible. According to https://kubernetes.io/docs/concepts/services-networking/ingress/ one could update an existing ingress yaml and subsequently run kubectl replace -f. From a microservice ...


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You need to add a host entry of mylocalserver in the host file against 127.0.0.1, like 127.0.0.1 mylocalserver. For /consul, there should be a /consul endpoint in your code to serve your request. As per your configuration, your http://localhost will be served because you have set proxypass for "/"(all). It will send all requests to the application/server ...


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