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6

Very few people were viewing this thread, so afterwards I posted a duplicate question on Stack Overflow, and now contains the answer. Below is a copy of it ... Finally, I found the problem. I wonder if this is a bug, or just poorly documented....(or maybe I just didn't interpret it correctly). As per Leo Lui-MSFT's suggestion above (documented by ...


3

You do not need to include anything into your assembly to run your tests using GitHub Actions. Just create workflow file in .github/workflows folder with the following content (assuming that you have .NET Core project): --- name: Tests on: push jobs: tests: name: Unit Testing runs-on: windows-latest steps: - uses: actions/checkout@v2.1....


2

Yes. AWS CodeDeploy bundletype is specified separately from the revision location, so you could upload a .nupkg to Amazon S3, set the bundle type to 'zip', and since a nupkg is simply an archive CodeDeploy will treat it as such and upload it to your EC2 instance. In your nuspec, make sure your appspec.yml gets placed in the root of your .nupkg. My project ...


1

It sounds like both of these pipelines are being triggered by the same source commit(s). If that's the case, you should be able to use CI trigger source path filters so that the builds only happen on commits to the relevant code. If a developer does a single commit that is committing changes to both the main application and the package library (which would ...


1

So what is happening is that the changed code just sat until internal testing was done (never a good thing as this is how code get stale quickly). Once internal testing was ready, the code was then merged into the trunk causing it to be published into nugget under the trunk's feed. Some business politics ensued and we finally got to a real single code base ...


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