10

It's not a good idea. In my experience you'll gain the disadvantages of both while any projected advantages will somehow fail to materialize. Itemized: You will lose speed. IT will comply with their own standard. The new task (for them) will follow the same 'sluggish' template all their work now has. Be prepared they will find it challenging - so even ...


8

Your question doesn't seem to make any assumption about the platform/OS it is about. Which is why it may make sense to add an answer about how this is typically done/addressed in a mainframe environment, where the "engineers" (as in your question title) are actually groups of people were dozens (possibly hundreds) of people are involved. My answer is based ...


7

Thankfully, since Site Reliability Engineering developed internally at Google and only recently has started to make its way into the broader community, it is fairly well-defined. What isn't, though, is web operations (or "systems administration" - as an example of the lack of clarity, you use both in your question). It's difficult to discuss the ...


6

You can find many of the answers in the result of DevOps survey which you should ask the product owner to read. This is a document written specifically for business people with little technical knowledge talking in the terms he should understand. At average you will need 1 extra developer for every 4 people to keep same level of feature development (38% vs ...


6

Large enterprises will commonly adopt a delivery framework, or operating model, that has been built to support large enterprises. From an Agile/DevOps perspective, which is my area of expertise there are three frameworks of interest: Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe®) defines DevOps as delivering business value through the successful operation of software in ...


5

Answer based on my knowledge of French "Internal controls" regulation, kind of equivalent to the SEC regulations you point to, I assume linking here to a French legal text would not be really useful and I know of no good translation of it. In an ideal 'You build it, you run it' model, everyone in the team will be accountable for the change. The risk ...


4

What you will lose by fitting into the IT organization is the "Dev" part of your little DevOps team. When teams become segmented into artificial roles of NetOps, SysOps and Dev, you introduce the following problems: Un-needed red tape and isolation - To do anything the developers will have to submit a ticket to IT and wait for them to implement it. They ...


4

TL;DR Yes, CaaS is very much a thing it means Container-Orchestration-as-a-Service. Kubernetes is the leading technology in this space. Long Version The key to understanding the following progression is the concept of "-as-a-Service": Dedicated → IaaS → CaaS → FaaS → PaaS → SaaS It means you are paying either an internal or external team money to ...


3

Whilst not strictly a standard approach, Google has published an SLI Menu and a process for developing SLIs for user journies: For each User Journey/Data Flow identify from the SLI Menu suitable types of SLI: Make a decision about how to measure good and valid events, Decide where to measure the SLI From out of the following: End User, Client-side ...


3

I would suggest that you adopt some of the IT team, and give them thorough training in the new system. Once they understand the system fully then it makes sense to offload it to them. Otherwise, you will become a Support Center for IT - and spend a lot of time firefighting as they learn the intricacies of the new system.


3

One of the people active in ChatOps community is Jason Hand from VictorOps, who wrote a book published by O'Reilly called Managing Operations in Group Chat. This book is available for free as part of their content marketing campaign. The previous ChatOps for Dummies is no longer available and is replaced by the above book. You should definitely take a look ...


2

Inability to report progress consistently across multiple development teams, for example, if one team reports their progress in terms of the number of equally sized stories completed in 2 weeks; whereas another team reports in storypoints completed in a three-week sprint. Inconsistent application of a practice means team members can not easily move between ...


2

None of the issues you present appear to be DevOps-specific to me. Some of the pitfalls organisations are trying to avoid are: Inability to report progress consistently across multiple development teams, for example, if one team reports their progress in terms of the number of equally sized stories completed in 2 weeks; whereas another team reports in ...


2

Since you reference the handling of vulnerabilities specifically in your question, I'll speak to this regarding how we handle this within our organization and group of companies. We have an Information Security department who are responsible to monitoring and detecting vulnerabilities. You could think of this team as being responsible to technical ...


1

From this 'awesome' chat ops resource collection. Articles So, What is ChatOps? And How do I Get Started? – ChatOps concepts and tools. What is ChatOps? A guide to its evolution, adoption, and significance – ChatOps and its adoption by HipChat Evangelist. How ChatOps can revolutionize your business – Benefits of using ChatOps, tools, current ...


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