Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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In my opinion, the DevOps culture come along with a methodology change toward Agile process management. ITIL is heavily aimed at a clear formalism of the process and the results and thus more adapted to a Waterfall model. This doesn't mean ITIL is incompatible with Devops, but usually this will be two separate process with different timelines. I mean that ...


24

The point of DevOps, is that development shouldn't oppose operations, instead they should support each other. Traditionally, due to waterfall deployments and large scale updates, development would cause operations a variety of problems when deploying due to inadequate testing, changing server environments, the list goes on and on. Essentially, the updates ...


12

I think you already got some comprehensive responses, but you said your english isn't great, so I'll try to provide a very brief and understandable answer: The primary goal of development is to make changes. The primary goal of operations is to keep the environment stable. These two things conflict. That being said, development and operations should not ...


11

The tension between development and operations is often caused by misalignment of incentives and attempts to optimize within the team. Developers are often judged by the speed and quantity of issues they can get through and merged into code repository and their reward is often not tied to that code actually working or working correctly. Much less scaling, ...


9

I'm ITIL certified (though it has been a while.) I agree with Tensibai: ITIL and DevOps aren't incompatbile, but that doesn't necessarily make them great friends. The argument can be made that the processes in ITIL must happen in some way, especially for larger organizations. Successful integration of DevOps practices, where ITIL is already practiced, ...


9

All in all any monitoring tool would do for this case, monit, nagios, shinken, icinga, centreon, or even a crontab in bash could do...


7

Most organizations deal with complexity by breaking down their organization into functional parts and demanding that each part figures out how to improve itself. This is often called the "silo" approach. It is important to understand why this silo approach blocks the success of the business and often fails to improve the organization as a whole. And it ...


6

I can't imagine having only one person on-call at a given time. There are several reasons that the primary person could be unable to handle an issue - perhaps they are unable to receive alerts, they have limited Internet access for a period of time, they or a family member could be ill and they are unable to work yet the on-call rotation hasn't been updated ...


5

Make sure that your stories are not centered on Operations. Remember that DevOps is a culture not a role. Is an "Operations Engineer" really the stakeholder for the story? Think of the features and business value they provide. As a stakeholder I want feature so that business value. If you are struggling to identify the business value why are you doing it? ...


3

Yes! And consider a third and a forth person if you're large enough. Folks can get sick. Their phone might have run out of battery. They might be dealing with a major local power outage. Folks go on vacation and forget to update the pager schedule. All of that, and more, can be addressed in a more reliable way by having a timeout on ack'ing a page ...


3

One of the people active in ChatOps community is Jason Hand from VictorOps, who wrote a book published by O'Reilly called Managing Operations in Group Chat. This book is available for free as part of their content marketing campaign. The previous ChatOps for Dummies is no longer available and is replaced by the above book. You should definitely take a look ...


2

As @XiongChiamiov mentioned, it's a very hard question to answer, but here's a clue: Artifactory is a network-bond server. It means given enough storage, CPU and memory, it will max out your network interface first. Network interface is considered maxed out at half its rated bandwidth limitation. That can help you do the math.


2

Yes, you should include names. "Blameless" postmortems do need to have detailed information and not be bowdlerized. Let me quote from one of the most definitive sources on blameless postmortems, the Etsy blog post that started it all. A Blameless Post-Mortem What does it mean to have a ‘blameless’ Post-Mortem? Does it mean everyone gets off ...


2

Usually for a blameless postmortem, the best idea is to go further than the human error (which for a proper 5 whys should not arise, that's rule 11, but we're just humans :)) and complete the 5 Whys with the 5 Hows. To follow on this particular case for a blameless postmortem I'd go few step further whith those iterations (For the sake of the example) of ...


2

Another option is to use Sensu. There are several plugins including a http one, that is able to check whether a response contains a certain string: check-http.rb -u http://my.site.com/health -q 'OK'


1

Without much data you are really guessing, the general thought I have heard before is to start at 80% SLO then work your way up as you have data to back up your goal. There really is not set way of figuring out a SLO without some data. Even taking and using a week's data would be good enough to give you a reasonable idea.


1

Whilst not strictly a standard approach, Google has published an SLI Menu and a process for developing SLIs for user journies: For each User Journey/Data Flow identify from the SLI Menu suitable types of SLI: Make a decision about how to measure good and valid events, Decide where to measure the SLI From out of the following: End User, Client-side ...


1

I agree with those who have commented that the role you describe doesn't really match a typical DevOps role. However, there are certain things you won't be able to change in your organization. Instead, focus on the things you can do. Understand the Objectives The best place to start is with a clear understanding of Service Level Objectives. What kinds of ...


1

If you use the Self-Organizing Swarm Plug-in to connect your build agents to your master, you can spin agents up/down without having to make any changes on your master. Agents will automatically register themselves with the master. You will have to supply credentials to the agents to self-register. I would suggest using SSM Parameter Store to store them and ...


1

So, the second example is clearly better - but surely they're missing the whole point of blameless culture? Firstly, it's not relevant who did it or if anyone really wants to follow the link and discover the person's name. People make mistakes and forget things. More importantly, nothing you've written is the root cause! Dig deeper into the "why"s. I'd ...


1

Try Sparky. This is a lightweight but powerful alternative to linux crontab. It comes with nice UI to see cronjob reports and statues. You can also run tasks remotely over ssh or through docker. The typical tasks you've mentioned are covered by existing DSL ( written on Perl6 ), for example: "Does a file, with a maximum age, exist on some network share?" ...


1

From this 'awesome' chat ops resource collection. Articles So, What is ChatOps? And How do I Get Started? – ChatOps concepts and tools. What is ChatOps? A guide to its evolution, adoption, and significance – ChatOps and its adoption by HipChat Evangelist. How ChatOps can revolutionize your business – Benefits of using ChatOps, tools, current ...


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