9

Update: Docker just released support for Kubernetes as scheduler, which changes the situation and makes Kubernetes just an alternative scheduler to Docker Swarm. TL;DR: DON'T DO IT. Engineers always try to create these dog-pigs. Every unnecessary technology you bring will bring another whole set of faults. If you can pick one, then pick one and be happy ...


7

Probably not the answer that you're looking for, but an answer nonetheless :) Learning about docker and its deployment methods could actually be included in the business requirements by making it part of the project or team development environment, just like the code language(s), version control system, compilers, test infrastructure, etc - to work in that ...


6

I'll give you my perspective. Developers should care about docker as there are other developers who are willing to use docker and have already built an expertise in it. They are willing to take up the roles of a DevOps engineer along with being a developer. So the Ops part of DevOps is what they are now building expertise on. These days, you'll find more ...


5

It is not about Docker or any other containerisation technologies out there. Containers like Docker, rkt, etc. are just way of delivering your application in similar fashion to static binary. You are building your deployment that it contains everything it need inside and end user doesn't need anything more than runtime. These solutions are similar to fat ...


4

welcome to DevOps SE, @bgarcial! Well I think there are the following options depending on the use case: Docker Container links are a according to the vendor site a legacy feature and you shouldn't use it Docker compose should work well but you can't scale horizontally: the stack is runnable only one a single machine With Docker Swarm using mostly same YML ...


4

https://forums.rancher.com/t/start-order-of-stack-containers/3106/9 We do not support depends_on, and neither does Docker in Swarm mode. It is not a real solution to the problem anyway and leaves you with unhandled pointy-edge cases when failures occur and containers are being replaced. Your services should know how to either wait for their ...


4

If you are running your production in docker container it's crucial that those container are being made by the same developers that have build the app running on them. Who else is better place to know what external dependency are needed and so on ... ? Also pipeline can fail at any step during a CD, particularly when it's the docker image build step, ...


4

Here are for example some arguments from a blog post published back 2014 and titled in way quite matching your answer: Much more flexible injection of new technologies into the environment there is still a massive pain point between committing the final tested code and then getting it running on the final production servers. Docker vastly simplifies ...


4

@Abhay Pai why not posting this as 5 different questions? Google for "left shift" in DevOps context. Consider DevOps team patterns http://web.devopstopologies.com/ "While DevOps raise problems and dispatch them to Dev to solve, the SRE approach is to find problems and solve some of them themselves." https://devops.com/sre-vs-devops-false-distinction/ ...


3

Welcome to the wonderful world of container orchestrators. Consider microservices for a moment. Each service should be independently deployed and independently scaled across a cluster of VMs. Where does basic Docker and Docker Compose fit in? They don’t compete with distributed system orchestrators like Openshift Kubernetes, CloudFoundry or Docker Swarm. A ...


3

If you are only running a single container or two containers together you are correct in that an orchestrator may be unnecessary and add unneeded complexity. However, these tools do solve several issues when you running several containers together (especially in production). What are the common problems with containers that must be solved by these ...


3

Take a look at OpenShift container platform (https://www.openshift.com/products/container-platform/). They seem to provide on-premise options. You might want to start with OpenShift Origin - the community edition (https://github.com/openshift/origin) to test for free if it fits your plan.


2

We are currently investigating https://github.com/roboll/helmfile to easily sync Helm charts across namespaces.


2

Edit: The deploy script that is described in this answer is very much looks like Helmfile and we are now in the process of upgrading to Helmfile so that we can retire our scripts that run multiple Helm releases as that’s that Helmfile does well. This is a bit of an alternative and indirect answer. Use infrastructure-as-code best practices to avoid ...


2

Docker gets lots of press and blog mentions which leads to developers getting interested in using it. For some people it is the interest in playing with a new technology or understanding how things work. For others it is a desire to add keywords to their resume. Either way, the more developers know about how things work and how they get deployed the less ...


2

What would be the best way to share ports among the containers? You don't really "share" ports between containers. Instead, you want to create network and attach each container to that network. Each container gets a network alias (essentially a hostname) that you can use to hit the service. $ docker network create foo $ docker run --network=foo --...


1

You can include the arguments in the deployment yaml. The official docs include examples and further customization. spec: containers: image: myimage name: myContainerName args: ["me", "yes", "https://my.url"]


1

A container runtime is the part of your container environment in charge of the creation and basic features of your containers. The obvious one is Docker, but you can also find Containerd, CRI-O and other as runtime for your containers. An orchestrator, by contrast, will not exactly create your container (ie, an orchestrator is not the technology used to ...


1

According to the README of the deis/workflow project on GitHub, it is no longer maintained since March 1, 2018. However, the README indicates that there is a fork, called Hephy Workflow. At the time of writing, this is the first time I heard about Deis and Hephy and I have not worked with these solutions. Alternatives to these products are OpenShift, ...


1

I would say that Istio is the de facto standard for Service Mesh. It is launched by both Google and IBM. Welcome to the service mesh era: Introducing a new Istio blog post series IBM, Google Cloud and the open community launch Istio 1.0 to bring microservices to the enterprise


1

I don't think "Managed Kubernetes" is reserved for AWS (EKS), there is Microsoft's Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) and Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) also, besides Red Hat's OpenShift. Those work as SaaS (or KaaS if you will). OpenShift has an on-premise version you can try called MiniShift in the OpenShift.org site, while there are other alternatives as ...


1

Heptio has open sourced a tool called Theseus to help with this. There's nothing built in to Kubernetes to do this, but check out the Theseus utility, you should be able to write a script to do this.


1

Your impression is false, linux containers (LXC) exists since 2008, mesos and docker have started later. All three makes use of cgroups available since kernel 2.6.28. For your overall question, mesosphere have a blog post about it. But mainly you're looking at it from the wrong point of view, choosing the underlying orchestration system should not be ...


1

You should take a look at BOSH. Its the tool that is used by CloudFoundry, its services and a distro of Kubernetes called Kubo for installation, management and "Day 2" operations. It's basically a declarative, cloud-agnostic orchestration tool that features rolling updates, canary deployments, scaling, monitoring and self healing. It can monitor VMs as ...


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