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18

It supports AccuRev, CVS, Subversion, Git, Mercurial, Perforce, Clearcase and RTC. For all of them exists a plugin and as you probably already know, Jenkins is not limited to only that list, anyone can create a SCM plugin for other options if they want to. Here is the link to the plugins: AccuRev: https://wiki.jenkins-ci.org/display/JENKINS/AccuRev+Plugin ...


12

GitOps is a technique of using Git to manage infrastructure provisioning and software deployments. This technique uses many of the features of Git such as Pull Requests to manage and trigger deployments, and allows "diffing" (looking at the difference between commits) to view the differences between deployments. DevOps is more of a culture or philosophy. ...


9

From my own experience, these are some the typical softwares packages: CA Endevor. SERENA ChangeMan ZMF. Compuware ISPW. IBM SCLM. All of these packages can manage, more or less out-of-the-box, anything that's stored in regular "PDS" components (a typical file structure used in z/OS). When it comes to a company evaluating which one best fits for them, it ...


9

In addition to the list in the previous answer, there is also the plugin that integrates Serena Dimensions CM with Jenkins. Some more details about this plugin (from the linked page): The plugin allows a Jenkins job to be associated with a Serena Dimensions CM stream or project, automatically updating the Jenkins workspace with file content from the ...


8

To explain something to anybody, try to compare it to something they are (hopefully) familiar with already. So that's why I just answer such question like so: Think of it as arriving at a place to stay (a hotel, a resort, etc): the very first thing you do (when you arrive) is to checkin. the very last thing you do (when you leave) is to checkout. A ...


6

It's important to note that the terms "checkin" and "checkout" have different meanings depending on the type of SCM system. Centralized systems like TFVC, Subversion, and Clearcase use "exclusive" checkouts. This is like Pierre's book borrowing metaphor, where only one user can have a file checked out at one time. Distributed systems like git have a "...


6

To answer the question of how to enforce something locally, you can't without doing some very heavy lifting around managing and enforcing the state of every developers workstation, and I'm usually of the opinion that developers should probably be local admins on their development machine because if they aren't then they will just spend their time figuring ...


6

A Sandbox could be part of the solution To bring material to the subject you can check the questions with tag sandbox on MetaSE, there are sanboxes for: Q/A formatting. Comments formatting. Chat. There's a feature request about "Can we get a Stack Exchange sandbox?" which has no status (neither declined, pending, review nor in-progress meta-tag). So I ...


5

The simplest/cleanest branch strategy is IMHO the one used in continuous deployment: a single/main integration branch which is also your release branch. From What is Your Branching Model?: Commits can go all the way to production from one trunk/master, if the automated build says the commit was good. It’s the turbo-switch for TBD, where no ...


5

Who is responsible for checking that people don't check in commits that have large files? The same people who are responsible for checking that the commits aren't bad in other ways: everyone. If git is new in your company, make sure that the git education includes this sort of thing. After that, it's up to code reviewers to notice mistakes and correct them. ...


4

Your question doesn't specify which platform (OS) it is about. But if it is about good old mainframes (running zOS, whereas the z stands for "zero downtime ..."), then these would be some possible options to pick from (quotes are from the linked pages): Compuware Source Code Download for Endevor, PDS, and ISPW Plugin. ... allows Jenkins users to ...


4

For centralized systems, think of it like a technical library. (might be a stretch of the imagination how this hypothetical library functions...) If you are an author of a document, you might checkout the library copy, make changes, return it check it back in to the library for the world to see. This can become an issue if the library has digital copies, ...


4

We require a review process using Pull requests in github onto our main dev or master branches. During that review process, we will mark pull requests as requiring changes if many files have white space or line ending differences, and insist that they follow the formatting of the dev or master branch they are making the pull request for. There are also some ...


3

You could use per repository config to override the user's config on a per-repository basis. When done on the repo considered to be the central source it should propagate with clones and pulls to other repos including local ones thus overriding centrally the local config. You can further enforce this through hooks in your central repo to check that file ...


3

With the SCM repository as the main subject then' checkout is getting changes out from the local or remote repository (into your local working directory). checkin is putting changes back into the the local or remote repository (from your local working directory).


3

If you want a beautiful integration between Docker and SCM, GitLab provides it's own built-in Docker registry. This makes publishing a Docker image in the build pipeline a breeze. The other big advantage of GitLab Docker registry is that it supports multiple Docker repositories for each GitLab repo. This allows you to create a new Docker repo for each ...


3

I was able to get an answer over here forums.docker.com Credit goes to dmaze. Set up some sort of automated build system (“continuous integration” in the current trendy term). Docker is sufficiently mainstream at this point that any of the cloud-based or locally-installed CI systems can do it. In your Dockerfile, use a LABEL to record the source of the ...


2

Having spent lots of time on github and various private corporate repos on gitlab and such there are certain things that make a huge difference in how good a repo seems to me: Does the README clearly state what the software does? Hopefully it also provides some code snippets, usage examples, and links to the preferred support forum. Any build or runtime ...


2

The answers above assume managing source code for z/OS has to be different from any other platform. The answer 10 years ago might have been the above. But z/OS has evolved along with the z hardware and it is no longer separate. You can use a modern source code manager such as Git for all your source code including any COBOL or PL/I or assembler you might ...


1

Checkout is an exclusive lock on modifying a branch of object in a repository. Checkin is a release of exclusive lock. There are two kinds of source control systems depending on what is the smallest unit of branching. 1) Per repository branching (CVS, SVN, GIT, Perforce, ... etc) In products where you branch the entire repository, checkout will ...


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